China Seminar

Thursday, 14 May, 2015, 12 noon

Maple Garden Restaurant
909 Isenberg Street, Honolulu

$20.00 for Friends of the East-West Center members, EWC and UH students
$25.00 for non-members
Luncheon served after the talk

China-US Strategic Philanthropy: Surprising Changes in China
Carol M. Fox

Philanthropy offers an important means of complementing government efforts to address critical economic and social issues in both China and the US.  As the two largest economies in the world, with more than half of the world’s billionaires, China and the US have the capacity to create important international philanthropic and public-private partnerships.  In the midst of historically unprecedented transition, China is working hard to enhance its social services, and recognizes that this calls for the growth of non-profit organizations.  By December of 2014, there were 4,137 foundations in China, compared to fewer than 400 just fifteen years earlier.  This explosive growth underscores the enormous potential of Chinese philanthropy.  At the same time, many leaders recognize that despite China’s long history of charity, modern philanthropy is in an early stage of development.  Future success depends on the government and the private sector establishing stronger non-profit leadership, greater accountability, and more supportive regulatory and tax policies.

Carol M. Fox is Director for Special Projects at the East-West Center. Since 2010, her primary focus has been on philanthropy in China. In partnership with the China Philanthropy Research Institute, she established the China-US Strategic Philanthropy Partnership (CUSP) with the goal of promoting communication, exchange and collaboration between the philanthropic sectors of China and the US to ensure the best use of resources and maximize the benefits to society. Ms. Fox’s professional career has spanned the East-West Center, National Gallery of Art, Bishop Museum, Honolulu Museum of Art, and seventeen years at The Nature Conservancy, where she helped expand their programs from Hawaii to the Asia Pacific Region, and eventually to China.  Before launching The Nature Conservancy’s China Program, she persuaded Henry M. Paulson (then head of Goldman Sachs, later 74th Secretary of the Treasury) and Singapore’s Premier Lee Kuan Yew to co-chair the Asia Pacific Council, the first group of leaders to focus on addressing regional issues of conservation and sustainable economic development.

To RSVP, please call 944-7111 or email friends@eastwestcenter.org.

Click here to download the event flyer.

China Seminar

Thursday, 9 April, 2015, 12 noon

Maple Garden Restaurant
909 Isenberg Street, Honolulu

$20.00 for Friends of the East-West Center members, EWC and UH students
$25.00 for non-members
Luncheon served after the talk

Clay Alchemy: Daoist Subjects in 17th Century Chinese Porcelain

Shawn Eichman

The 17th century represents a highlight in the long history of Chinese ceramics. Often known as the “Transitional Period,” since it saw the end of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and the beginning of the following Qing dynasty (1644-1911), this century is unique in that the Imperial kilns were without court patronage for several decades, resulting in the dissemination of the highest quality porcelain to new markets with diverse needs and interests. Popular culture became a common source for decoration on porcelain during this time, including Daoist immortals and other religious themes, some of which are widely known, while others are without precedent from other periods. Based on a presentation given at Christie’s New York in March 2015, in this talk Dr. Eichman will introduce some of the main Daoist subjects found on Chinese porcelain during the Transitional Period, including popular folk figures such as the Eight Immortals and deities such as the Perfected Warrior (Zhenwu), tracing the historical development of these themes and the ways in which they came to be used as decoration on porcelain.

Shawn Eichman is Curator of Asian Art at the Honolulu Museum of Art. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgetown University, Master’s degrees from the University of Hawaii and Waseda University, and a Ph.D. in Chinese Literature from the University of Hawaii. Prior to the Honolulu Museum of Art, he worked at The Art Institute of Chicago, the Nelson-Atkins Museum, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Art. His most recent publication is Masterpieces of Landscape Painting from the Forbidden City, which accompanied the major exhibition of the same name at the Honolulu Museum of Art in 2011.

To RSVP, please call 944-7111 or email friends@eastwestcenter.org.

Click here to download the event flyer.

China Seminar

Thursday, 12 March, 2015, 12 noon

Maple Garden Restaurant
909 Isenberg Street, Honolulu

$20.00 for Friends of the East-West Center members, EWC and UH students
$25.00 for non-members
Luncheon served after the talk

The World I See: Through the Lens of a Young Chinese Journalist

Wei Zhu

Through almost ten years of working as a photographer and photo editor for Xinhua News Agency, Wei Zhu has been to many places capturing news events through the lens of his camera. Whether it was the catastrophic scene of 2008 Sichuan earthquake or standing in front of the runway during New York catwalk fashion shows or covering war-torn Pakistan, Wei Zhu has witnessed the pains and joy of people around the world. He has a feeling of honor, passion and sense of mission. Every time he grabs his camera and aims the viewfinder, he tries to capture the most symbolic moments with strong emotions. He tries to explore the deeper meaning behind the scene and gives an aesthetic way of viewing the world from his angles and composition. Zhu will present a slideshow of the world as seen through his lens and perspective of the world as seen from a photographer who is part of China’s younger generation.

Wei Zhu entered Xinhua News Agency in 2005. His major reporting as photographer and photo editor including Beijing summit of China-Africa Cooperation Forum, APEC summit in Sydney, the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake, Beijing Olympic Games, Pakistani Presidential Election. From November 2009 to December 2011, he was a photojournalist/editor with Xinhua’s North America Bureau based in New York. During that time he covered general news in New York and major news in the United States, including the oil spill in Gulf of Mexico, awarding ceremony of the Oscars, commemoration ceremony of the 9/11 attacks, annual meeting of the United Nation’s General Assembly, New York Fashion Week, Occupy Wall Street, etc.

To RSVP, please call 944-7111 or email friends@eastwestcenter.org.

Click here to download the event flyer.

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