April China Seminar

Thursday, 11 April, 2019, 12 noon

at

Maple Garden Restaurant, 909 Isenberg Street, Honolulu

Topic:

Finding KUKAN – A “Lost” Documentary

By

Robin Lung

In the award-winning documentary Finding KUKAN, Robin Lung investigates the compelling story of Hawaiʻi born Li Ling-Ai, the uncredited producer of KUKANKUKAN is a landmark color documentary about World War II China that received an Academy Award in 1942 before becoming “lost” for decades. In Finding KUKAN, Lung discovers a badly damaged print of KUKAN and pieces together the inspirational tale behind Li and her cameraman Rey Scott. Robin Lung will show clips from Finding KUKAN and speak about lessons learned during her 8-year filmmaking journey.

Robin Lung is a 4th generation Chinese American from Hawaiʻi with an 18-year history of bringing untold minority and womenʻs stories to film. A Stanford University and Hunter College graduate, she became a filmmaker after successful careers in book publishing and higher education. Lung made her directorial debut with Washington Place: Hawai‘i’s First Home, a 30-minute documentary for PBS Hawai‘i about the legacy of Hawaiʻi’s Queen Lili‘uokalani and her personal home. She was the associate producer for the national PBS documentary Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority, and producer/director of the feature documentary Finding KUKAN, which was selected to be broadcasted nationally on PBS World’s America ReFramed series and has won multiple awards at film festivals across America.

REGISTRATION FORM
or
REGISTER ONLINE

March China Seminar

Thursday, 14 March, 2019, 12 noon

at

Maple Garden Restaurant, 909 Isenberg Street, Honolulu

Topic:

When Bohemia Meets Hawaii – wandering in a multicultural world

By

DING Yi

DING Yi, a Parvin Fellow and a Chinese journalist from Xinhua News Agency, conducts a study of cultural differences between the Bohemian culture in the Czech Republic and the Aloha spirit in Hawaii through the lens of her personal experiences. Based on her unique perspectives as a journalist in Prague and as a visiting scholar in Honolulu, she will present a colorful world from a Chinese angle, and showcase some anecdotes ranging from writing-table to dining-table, and from a Xinhua reporter’s life in Europe to the life of a Chinese visiting scholar with media background who now studies in the United States.

DING Yi worked in the Prague branch of Xinhua News Agency from 2006 to 2008. After writing a personal column (2013-2014), and political commentaries (2010-2014), she now specializes in social and cultural stories. In 2016, she participated in a Xinhua research team to Africa, which brought her to Kenya, Ethiopia and Cote d’Ivoire. The highlights of her journalist work include the 13th Five-Year Plan in China; Sino-U.S., Sino-European and Sino-African relationships and cultural exchanges; the largest wave of Chinese overseas returnees, and the cultural spread of the Spring Festival (Chinese New Year) abroad.

REGISTRATION FORM
or
REGISTER ONLINE

February China Seminar

CHINA SEMINAR

Thursday, 14 February, 2019, 12 noon

Topic:

The Great Disillusionment

The end of 25 years of global consensus that China would become a pillar of global order

By

Richard Hornik

In 2018, even Old Friends of China like Henry Paulson have gone public with criticisms of the government. Former ambassadors to China have written distinctly undiplomatic critiques. Academics openly question the self-censorship they had previously accepted as the price of entry into the Middle Kingdom. The downside of mega-billion infrastructure loans from China has begun to dawn on developing countries, and the security risks of buying telecommunications equipment from companies like Huawei and ZTE have slowed their global expansion to a crawl. Even western business people, heretofore blinded to the growing challenges of doing business in China by its massive market, have begun to retreat. Was this disillusionment inevitable, or is it the product of Xi Jinping’s aggressive approach to domestic and foreign affairs? Is this a mere speed bump or a serious setback that will magnify the country’s already serious economic challenges?    

Richard Hornik, Director of Overseas Partnerships at Stony Brook University’s Center for News Literacy, is a journalist with over 30 years of global experience. He was executive editor of AsiaWeek, and served as Time’s bureau chief in Warsaw, Boston, Beijing and Hong Kong. He co-authored Massacre in Beijing: China’s Struggle for Democracy and has written for Foreign Affairs, Fortune, Smithsonian, The New York Times and Wall St. Journal. He has an M.A. in Russian studies from George Washington University and a B.A. in political science from Brown University. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and was Journalist-in-Residence at the EWC. He was a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Hong Kong in 2012 and at UHM in Spring 2015, when he was the inaugural Daniel K. Inouye Visiting Scholar.

Register Online
or
Mail-in Registration Form